Bourbon | www.drinks.ng

10 Things You Didn’t Know About Bourbon

Bourbon is a very popular spirit, known around the globe for its great quality and taste. Although Bourbon is really popular, there are some facts about that we’re sure you’ve never heard of. Here are amazing Bourbon facts below.

 

1. The name Bourbon is originally derived from the House of Bourbon.


They were French royalty who first came to power in the 16th century and eventually ruled over France, Sicily, Spain, Luxembourg, Parma, and Naples.

2. By law, straight bourbon must be aged in barrels for at least two years. Bourbon need only be placed in a new oak container for a few seconds to be called bourbon.

3. It doesn’t have to be made in Kentucky.

Although 95% comes from the Bluegrass State, Kentuckians don’t have an exclusive claim. It can be made in other states, but bourbon does need to be made in the United States.

4. By official government mandate, these rules must be thumb-tacked to the corkboard of every distillery:


Bourbon must be made from at least 51% corn, aged in new charred oak barrels, begin barrel-aging at no more than 125 proof, and be bottled between 80 and 160 proof.

5. It makes a good medicine.

During World War II, many distilleries were converted to produce penicillin, which is also a product of fermentation that will cure what ails you.

6. There are more barrels of bourbon (4.7m) in kentucky than people (4.3m).

7. Bourbon is the only product in the world which you cannot legally add colour or additives to.

Only water, wheat, corn, rye, malt and the colourisation of the barrel are allowed to influence the consistency of the golden beverage.

8. US law states bourbon barrels can only be used once.

This is why many are later shipped to whisky distilleries across the world.

9. Bourbon is America’s only native spirit.

As declared by Congress in 1964. It must be made with a minimum of 51 percent corn, aged in charred new oak barrels, stored at no more than 125 proof and bottled no less than 80 proof.

10. Bourbon is responsible for the drinking straw

 

Until the late 1880s, cocktails were sipped through a hollow stalk of ryegrass, often leaving an unpleasant residue as it deteriorated. One fateful day, however, Washington, DC, resident Marvin Stone was sucking down his freshly made Mint Julep and contending with the faulty piece of grass when it occurred to him that even paper would do a better job. He began by tightly wrapping several strips of paper around a pencil, then he removed the pencil and glued the papers into a sturdy cylindrical shape. Stone’s ingenious tool immediately caught on with drinkers around the country, and in 1888, the inventor patented a version made of paraffin-coated manila.

Sign up for newsletter

Or Follow us on

  • facebook icon
  • twitter icon
  • instagram icon
  • linkedin icon
  • youtube icon
Loading