People Who Drink Alcohol are Less Liable to Die Young | www.drinks.ng

Study shows…

Read that again! Yes, you read that exactly right. A study has shown that frequent alcohol drinkers are less likely to die prematurely than those who have never consumed alcohol. The study, published by Time Magazine, says that staying away from alcohol altogether may lead to a shorter life than drinking consistently and moderately.

This tightly-controlled study involved people between the ages of 55 and 65 for a period of over 20 years and accounted for variables ranging from socio-economic statuses to levels of physical activity. Led by Charles Holahan, a psychologist of the University of Texas, the study revealed individuals who never had a sip of an adult beverage had the highest mortality rates, while heavy drinkers had lower mortality rates. Furthermore, the individuals who drank moderately, enjoying one to three drinks per day, had the lowest mortality rate. Most notably, the study found even heavy drinkers fared better than those who abstained from alcohol with a 60 percentile mortality rate!

We all know about the increased risks associated with alcohol consumption including cirrhosis, cancer, accidents, poor judgement and dependency. Despite all these, according to the study, those who take alcohol are less likely to die young than those who stay away from it entirely. Why is this happening? Well, a great explanation for it is the fact that as human beings, building social networks is vital for maintaining physical and mental health, and alcohol is the best social lubricant. Consequently, people who don’t drink demonstrate stronger signs of depression than those who do. Also, let’s not forget the heart health and circulation benefits of moderate drinking, especially for lovers of red wine.

So yes, drink responsibly. But please drink. For a better, longer life, raise a glass every day.

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